Tag / css3

  • March 7, 2017 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    HTML5 and CSS3 References

    The following section contains references to latest HTML5, CSS3 and more… HTML5 / XHTML Tags The following section contains a complete list of standard tags belonging to the HTML5 and XHTML 1.0 specifications. All the tags are ordered alphabetically. A <a> <abbr> <acronym> <address> <applet> <area> <article> <aside> <audio> B <b> <base> <basefont> <bdi> <bdo> <big> <blockquote> […]

    Read More
  • November 19, 2012 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    CSS3 new attribute selectors

    CSS3 introduce 3 new selectors for the sub-string or matching attributes. they are [att^=val], [att$=val] and [att*=val]. these selectors coming under Sub-string Matching Attribute Selectors section. [att^=val] This is the “begins with” selector. This selector allows for the selection of elements where a specified attribute begins with a specified string. example: <pre>a[alt~=”Kerala”] { color:#00aa00; font-size:14px; […]

    Read More
  • February 8, 2010 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    web designing paradigm

    fdsf

    Read More
  • April 15, 2009 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    Selector syntax

    A simple selector is either a type selector or universal selector followed immediately by zero or more attribute selectors, ID selectors, or pseudo-classes, in any order. The simple selector matches if all of its components match. A selector is a chain of one or more simple selectors separated by combinators. Combinators are: whitespace, “>”, and […]

    Read More
  • April 15, 2008 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    Boxtest

    Boxtest Here is a sample div with class “boxtest”. It has 20px border, 30px padding, and 300px width. div.boxtest { border:20px solid; padding:30px; background: #ffc; width:300px;} The total width including borders and padding should be 400px. 20+30+300+30+20 = 400 User agents which misinterpret the CSS1 box model by placing border and padding inside the specified […]

    Read More
  • March 22, 2008 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    Ultimate List Of Online Color Tools

    As a web designer, we will always deal with colors. There are a lot of useful online color tools such as color wheel, color scheme, color palette, color picker, and etc. Let’s start looking at the list: Color Wheel 1. 4096 Color Wheel 2. Color Wheel from Colors On The Web 3. Color Wheel Color […]

    Read More

Deprecated: mysql_connect(): The mysql extension is deprecated and will be removed in the future: use mysqli or PDO instead in /home/chayicnl/public_html/wp-content/themes/odayanchal/includes/serverclasses.php on line 22

January 23, 1957: Toy company Wham-O produces first Frisbees

Posted on Tuesday January 23, 2018 - This Day in World History

On this day in 1957, machines at the Wham-O toy company roll out the first batch of their aerodynamic plastic discs–now known to millions of fans all over the world as Frisbees.

The story of the Frisbee began in Bridgeport, Connecticut, where William Frisbie opened the Frisbie Pie Company in 1871. Students from nearby universities would throw the empty pie tins to each other, yelling “Frisbie!” as they let go. In 1948, Walter Frederick Morrison and his partner Warren Franscioni invented a plastic version of the disc called the “Flying Saucer” that could fly further and more accurately than the tin pie plates. After splitting with Franscioni, Morrison made an improved model in 1955 and sold it to the new toy company Wham-O as the “Pluto Platter”–an attempt to cash in on the public craze over space and Unidentified Flying Objects (UFOs).

In 1958, a year after the toy’s first release, Wham-O–the company behind such top-sellers as the Hula-Hoop, the Super Ball and the Water Wiggle–changed its name to the Frisbee disc, misspelling the name of the historic pie company. A company designer, Ed Headrick, patented the design for the modern Frisbee in December 1967, adding a band of raised ridges on the disc’s surface–called the Rings–to stabilize flight. By aggressively marketing Frisbee-playing as a new sport, Wham-O sold over 100 million units of its famous toy by 1977.

High school students in Maplewood, New Jersey, invented Ultimate Frisbee, a cross between football, soccer and basketball, in 1967. In the 1970s, Headrick himself invented Frisbee Golf, in which discs are tossed into metal baskets; there are now hundreds of courses in the U.S., with millions of devotees. There is also Freestyle Frisbee, with choreographed routines set to music and multiple discs in play, and various Frisbee competitions for both humans and dogs–the best natural Frisbee players.

Today, at least 60 manufacturers produce the flying discs–generally made out of plastic and measuring roughly 20-25 centimeters (8-10 inches) in diameter with a curved lip. The official Frisbee is owned by Mattel Toy Manufacturers, who bought the toy from Wham-O in 1994.