Tag / css3

  • March 7, 2017 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    HTML5 and CSS3 References

    The following section contains references to latest HTML5, CSS3 and more… HTML5 / XHTML Tags The following section contains a complete list of standard tags belonging to the HTML5 and XHTML 1.0 specifications. All the tags are ordered alphabetically. A <a> <abbr> <acronym> <address> <applet> <area> <article> <aside> <audio> B <b> <base> <basefont> <bdi> <bdo> <big> <blockquote> […]

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  • November 19, 2012 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    CSS3 new attribute selectors

    CSS3 introduce 3 new selectors for the sub-string or matching attributes. they are [att^=val], [att$=val] and [att*=val]. these selectors coming under Sub-string Matching Attribute Selectors section. [att^=val] This is the “begins with” selector. This selector allows for the selection of elements where a specified attribute begins with a specified string. example: <pre>a[alt~=”Kerala”] { color:#00aa00; font-size:14px; […]

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  • February 8, 2010 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    web designing paradigm

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  • April 15, 2009 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    Selector syntax

    A simple selector is either a type selector or universal selector followed immediately by zero or more attribute selectors, ID selectors, or pseudo-classes, in any order. The simple selector matches if all of its components match. A selector is a chain of one or more simple selectors separated by combinators. Combinators are: whitespace, “>”, and […]

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  • April 15, 2008 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    Boxtest

    Boxtest Here is a sample div with class “boxtest”. It has 20px border, 30px padding, and 300px width. div.boxtest { border:20px solid; padding:30px; background: #ffc; width:300px;} The total width including borders and padding should be 400px. 20+30+300+30+20 = 400 User agents which misinterpret the CSS1 box model by placing border and padding inside the specified […]

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  • March 22, 2008 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    Ultimate List Of Online Color Tools

    As a web designer, we will always deal with colors. There are a lot of useful online color tools such as color wheel, color scheme, color palette, color picker, and etc. Let’s start looking at the list: Color Wheel 1. 4096 Color Wheel 2. Color Wheel from Colors On The Web 3. Color Wheel Color […]

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August 23, 1902: Fannie Farmer opens cooking school

Posted on Wednesday August 23, 2017 - This Day in World History

On this day in 1902, pioneering cookbook author Fannie Farmer, who changed the way Americans prepare food by advocating the use of standardized measurements in recipes, opens Miss Farmer’s School of Cookery in Boston. In addition to teaching women about cooking, Farmer later educated medical professionals about the importance of proper nutrition for the sick.

Farmer was born March 23, 1857, and raised near Boston, Massachusetts. Her family believed in education for women and Farmer attended Medford High School; however, as a teenager she suffered a paralytic stroke that turned her into a homebound invalid for a period of years. As a result, she was unable to complete high school or attend college and her illness left her with a permanent limp. When she was in her early 30s, Farmer attended the Boston Cooking School. Founded in 1879, the school promoted a scientific approach to food preparation and trained women to become cooking teachers at a time when their employment opportunities were limited. Farmer graduated from the program in 1889 and in 1891 became the school’s principal. In 1896, she published her first cookbook, The Boston Cooking School Cookbook, which included a wide range of straightforward recipes along with information on cooking and sanitation techniques, household management and nutrition. Farmer’s book became a bestseller and revolutionized American cooking through its use of precise measurements, a novel culinary concept at the time.

In 1902, Farmer left the Boston Cooking School and founded Miss Farmer’s School of Cookery. In addition to running her school, she traveled to speaking engagements around the U.S. and continued to write cookbooks. In 1904, she published Food and Cookery for the Sick and Convalescent, which provided food recommendations for specific diseases, nutritional information for children and information about the digestive system, among other topics. Farmer’s expertise in the areas of nutrition and illness led her to lecture at Harvard Medical School.

Farmer died January 15, 1915, at age 57. After Farmer’s death, Alice Bradley, who taught at Miss Farmer’s School of Cookery, took over the business and ran it until the mid-1940s. The Fannie Farmer Cookbook is still in print today.