Category / css3

  • November 19, 2012 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    CSS3 new attribute selectors

    CSS3 introduce 3 new selectors for the sub-string or matching attributes. they are [att^=val], [att$=val] and [att*=val]. these selectors coming under Sub-string Matching Attribute Selectors section. [att^=val] This is the “begins with” selector. This selector allows for the selection of elements where a specified attribute begins with a specified string. example: <pre>a[alt~=”Kerala”] { color:#00aa00; font-size:14px; […]

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  • October 4, 2012 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    CSS3 Gradient Backgrounds

     The CSS gradient feature was introduced by Webkit for about two years but was rarely used due to incompatibility with most browers. But now with the Firefox 3.6+, which supports gradient, we can style create gradient without having to create an image. This post will show you how to code for the CSS gradient to […]

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  • December 11, 2009 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    CSS Positioning

    Position:Static The default positioning for all elements is position:static, which means the element is not positioned and occurs where it normally would in the document.Normally you wouldn’t specify this unless you needed to override a positioning that had been previously set. #div-1 { position:static; }   Position:Relative If you specify position:relative, then you can use […]

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  • April 15, 2009 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    Selector syntax

    A simple selector is either a type selector or universal selector followed immediately by zero or more attribute selectors, ID selectors, or pseudo-classes, in any order. The simple selector matches if all of its components match. A selector is a chain of one or more simple selectors separated by combinators. Combinators are: whitespace, “>”, and […]

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  • January 15, 2009 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    Rounded Corners

    When New WordPress started using this i though you know Internet Explorer is definitely out now when i’m doing some css work that needs rounded corners I’m mostly using only this technique because buyers are ok with it although it’s just for FireFox and Safari. And since most of people still don’t know about this […]

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  • June 15, 2008 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    CSS font shorthand rule

    When styling fonts with CSS you may be doing this:font-size: 1em;line-height: 1.5em;font-weight: bold;font-style: italic;font-variant: small-caps;font-family: verdana,serif; There’s no need though as you can use this CSS shorthand property:font: 1em/1.5em bold italic small-caps verdana,serif Much better! Just a couple of words of warning: This CSS shorthand version will only work if you’re specifying both the font-size […]

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  • June 6, 2008 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    Why tables for layout is stupid:

    Tables existed in HTML for one reason: To display tabular data. But then border=”0″ made it possible for designers to have a grid upon which to lay out images and text. Still the most dominant means of designing visually rich Web sites, the use of tables is now actually interfering with building a better, more […]

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  • June 5, 2008 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    IE and width & height issues

    IE has a rather strange way of doing things. It doesn’t understand the min-width and min-height commands, but instead interprets width and height as min-width and min-height – go figure! This can cause problems, because we may need boxes to be resizable should more text need to go in them or should the user resize […]

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  • - Rajesh Odayanchal

    Minimum width for a page

    A very handy CSS command that exists is the min-width command, whereby you can specify a minimum width for any element. This can be particularly useful for specifying a minimum width for a page. Unfortunately, IE doesn’t understand this command, so we’ll need to come up with a new way of making this work in […]

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  • June 4, 2008 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    CSS Block and inline level elements

    Nearly all HTML elements are either block or inline elements. The characteristics of block elements include: begin on a new line Height, line-height and top and bottom margins can be manipulated defaults to 100% of their containing element, unless a width is specified Examples of block elements include , , , , and . Inline […]

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April 25, 1983: Andropov writes to U.S. student

Posted on Wednesday April 25, 2018 - This Day in World History

On this day in 1983, the Soviet Union releases a letter that Russian leader Yuri Andropov wrote to Samantha Smith, an American fifth-grader from Manchester, Maine, inviting her to visit his country. Andropov’s letter came in response to a note Smith had sent him in December 1982, asking if the Soviets were planning to start a nuclear war. At the time, the United States and Soviet Union were Cold War enemies.

President Ronald Reagan, a passionate anti-communist, had dubbed the Soviet Union the “evil empire” and called for massive increases in U.S. defense spending to meet the perceived Soviet threat. In his public relations duel with Reagan, known as the “Great Communicator,” Andropov, who had succeeded longtime Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev in 1982, assumed a folksy, almost grandfatherly approach that was incongruous with the negative image most Americans had of the Soviets.

Andropov’s letter said that Russian people wanted to “live in peace, to trade and cooperate with all our neighbors on the globe, no matter how close or far away they are, and, certainly, with such a great country as the United States of America.” In response to Smith’s question about whether the Soviet Union wished to prevent nuclear war, Andropov declared, “Yes, Samantha, we in the Soviet Union are endeavoring and doing everything so that there will be no war between our two countries, so that there will be no war at all on earth.” Andropov also complimented Smith, comparing her to the spunky character Becky Thatcher from “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” by Mark Twain.

Smith, born June 29, 1972, accepted Andropov’s invitation and flew to the Soviet Union with her parents for a visit. Afterward, she became an international celebrity and peace ambassador, making speeches, writing a book and even landing a role on an American television series. In February 1984, Yuri Andropov died from kidney failure and was succeeded by Konstantin Chernenko. The following year, in August 1985, Samantha Smith died tragically in a plane crash at age 13.