Category / css3

  • November 19, 2012 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    CSS3 new attribute selectors

    CSS3 introduce 3 new selectors for the sub-string or matching attributes. they are [att^=val], [att$=val] and [att*=val]. these selectors coming under Sub-string Matching Attribute Selectors section. [att^=val] This is the “begins with” selector. This selector allows for the selection of elements where a specified attribute begins with a specified string. example: <pre>a[alt~=”Kerala”] { color:#00aa00; font-size:14px; […]

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  • October 4, 2012 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    CSS3 Gradient Backgrounds

     The CSS gradient feature was introduced by Webkit for about two years but was rarely used due to incompatibility with most browers. But now with the Firefox 3.6+, which supports gradient, we can style create gradient without having to create an image. This post will show you how to code for the CSS gradient to […]

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  • December 11, 2009 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    CSS Positioning

    Position:Static The default positioning for all elements is position:static, which means the element is not positioned and occurs where it normally would in the document.Normally you wouldn’t specify this unless you needed to override a positioning that had been previously set. #div-1 { position:static; }   Position:Relative If you specify position:relative, then you can use […]

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  • April 15, 2009 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    Selector syntax

    A simple selector is either a type selector or universal selector followed immediately by zero or more attribute selectors, ID selectors, or pseudo-classes, in any order. The simple selector matches if all of its components match. A selector is a chain of one or more simple selectors separated by combinators. Combinators are: whitespace, “>”, and […]

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  • January 15, 2009 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    Rounded Corners

    When New WordPress started using this i though you know Internet Explorer is definitely out now when i’m doing some css work that needs rounded corners I’m mostly using only this technique because buyers are ok with it although it’s just for FireFox and Safari. And since most of people still don’t know about this […]

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  • June 15, 2008 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    CSS font shorthand rule

    When styling fonts with CSS you may be doing this:font-size: 1em;line-height: 1.5em;font-weight: bold;font-style: italic;font-variant: small-caps;font-family: verdana,serif; There’s no need though as you can use this CSS shorthand property:font: 1em/1.5em bold italic small-caps verdana,serif Much better! Just a couple of words of warning: This CSS shorthand version will only work if you’re specifying both the font-size […]

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  • June 6, 2008 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    Why tables for layout is stupid:

    Tables existed in HTML for one reason: To display tabular data. But then border=”0″ made it possible for designers to have a grid upon which to lay out images and text. Still the most dominant means of designing visually rich Web sites, the use of tables is now actually interfering with building a better, more […]

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  • June 5, 2008 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    IE and width & height issues

    IE has a rather strange way of doing things. It doesn’t understand the min-width and min-height commands, but instead interprets width and height as min-width and min-height – go figure! This can cause problems, because we may need boxes to be resizable should more text need to go in them or should the user resize […]

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  • - Rajesh Odayanchal

    Minimum width for a page

    A very handy CSS command that exists is the min-width command, whereby you can specify a minimum width for any element. This can be particularly useful for specifying a minimum width for a page. Unfortunately, IE doesn’t understand this command, so we’ll need to come up with a new way of making this work in […]

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  • June 4, 2008 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    CSS Block and inline level elements

    Nearly all HTML elements are either block or inline elements. The characteristics of block elements include: begin on a new line Height, line-height and top and bottom margins can be manipulated defaults to 100% of their containing element, unless a width is specified Examples of block elements include , , , , and . Inline […]

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August 19, 1909: First race is held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway

Posted on Saturday August 19, 2017 - This Day in World History

On this day in 1909, the first race is held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, now the home of the world’s most famous motor racing competition, the Indianapolis 500.

Built on 328 acres of farmland five miles northwest of Indianapolis, Indiana, the speedway was started by local businessmen as a testing facility for Indiana’s growing automobile industry. The idea was that occasional races at the track would pit cars from different manufacturers against each other. After seeing what these cars could do, spectators would presumably head down to the showroom of their choice to get a closer look.

The rectangular two-and-a-half-mile track linked four turns, each exactly 440 yards from start to finish, by two long and two short straight sections. In that first five-mile race on August 19, 1909, 12,000 spectators watched Austrian engineer Louis Schwitzer win with an average speed of 57.4 miles per hour. The track’s surface of crushed rock and tar proved a disaster, breaking up in a number of places and causing the deaths of two drivers, two mechanics and two spectators.

The surface was soon replaced with 3.2 million paving bricks, laid in a bed of sand and fixed with mortar. Dubbed “The Brickyard,” the speedway reopened in December 1909. In 1911, low attendance led the track’s owners to make a crucial decision: Instead of shorter races, they resolved to focus on a single, longer event each year, for a much larger prize. That May 30 marked the debut of the Indy 500–a grueling 500-mile race that was an immediate hit with audiences and drew press attention from all over the country. Driver Ray Haroun won the purse of $14,250, with an average speed of 74.59 mph and a total time of 6 hours and 42 minutes.

Since 1911, the Indianapolis 500 has been held every year, with the exception of 1917-18 and 1942-45, when the United States was involved in the two world wars. With an average crowd of 400,000, the Indy 500 is the best-attended event in U.S. sports. In 1936, asphalt was used for the first time to cover the rougher parts of the track, and by 1941 most of the track was paved. The last of the speedway’s original bricks were covered in 1961, except for a three-foot line of bricks left exposed at the start-finish line as a nostalgic reminder of the track’s history.