Archives / June 2008

  • June 15, 2008 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    CSS font shorthand rule

    When styling fonts with CSS you may be doing this:font-size: 1em;line-height: 1.5em;font-weight: bold;font-style: italic;font-variant: small-caps;font-family: verdana,serif; There’s no need though as you can use this CSS shorthand property:font: 1em/1.5em bold italic small-caps verdana,serif Much better! Just a couple of words of warning: This CSS shorthand version will only work if you’re specifying both the font-size […]

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  • June 6, 2008 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    Why tables for layout is stupid:

    Tables existed in HTML for one reason: To display tabular data. But then border=”0″ made it possible for designers to have a grid upon which to lay out images and text. Still the most dominant means of designing visually rich Web sites, the use of tables is now actually interfering with building a better, more […]

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  • June 5, 2008 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    IE and width & height issues

    IE has a rather strange way of doing things. It doesn’t understand the min-width and min-height commands, but instead interprets width and height as min-width and min-height – go figure! This can cause problems, because we may need boxes to be resizable should more text need to go in them or should the user resize […]

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  • - Rajesh Odayanchal

    Minimum width for a page

    A very handy CSS command that exists is the min-width command, whereby you can specify a minimum width for any element. This can be particularly useful for specifying a minimum width for a page. Unfortunately, IE doesn’t understand this command, so we’ll need to come up with a new way of making this work in […]

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  • The characters that appear in the first column of the following table are generated from Unicode numeric character references, and so they should appear correctly in any Web browser that supports Unicode and that has suitable fonts available, regardless of the operating system. Character ANSINumber UnicodeNumber ANSIHex UnicodeHex HTML 4.0Entity Unicode Name Unicode Range ‘ […]

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  • Nearly all HTML elements are either block or inline elements. The characteristics of block elements include: begin on a new line Height, line-height and top and bottom margins can be manipulated defaults to 100% of their containing element, unless a width is specified Examples of block elements include , , , , and . Inline […]

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April 24, 1916: Easter Rebellion begins

Posted on Monday April 24, 2017 - This Day in World History

On this day in 1916, on Easter Monday in Dublin, the Irish Republican Brotherhood, a secret organization of Irish nationalists led by Patrick Pearse, launches the so-called Easter Rebellion, an armed uprising against British rule. Assisted by militant Irish socialists under James Connolly, Pearse and his fellow Republicans rioted and attacked British provincial government headquarters across Dublin and seized the Irish capital’s General Post Office. Following these successes, they proclaimed the independence of Ireland, which had been under the repressive thumb of the United Kingdom for centuries, and by the next morning were in control of much of the city. Later that day, however, British authorities launched a counteroffensive, and by April 29 the uprising had been crushed. Nevertheless, the Easter Rebellion is considered a significant marker on the road to establishing an independent Irish republic.

Following the uprising, Pearse and 14 other nationalist leaders were executed for their participation and held up as martyrs by many in Ireland. There was little love lost among most Irish people for the British, who had enacted a series of harsh anti-Catholic restrictions, the Penal Laws, in the 18th century, and then let 1.5 million Irish starve during the Potato Famine of 1845-1848. Armed protest continued after the Easter Rebellion and in 1921, 26 of Ireland’s 32 counties won independence with the declaration of the Irish Free State. The Free State became an independent republic in 1949. However, six northeastern counties of the Emerald Isle remained part of the United Kingdom, prompting some nationalists to reorganize themselves into the Irish Republican Army (IRA) to continue their struggle for full Irish independence.

In the late 1960s, influenced in part by the U.S. civil rights movement, Catholics in Northern Ireland, long discriminated against by British policies that favored Irish Protestants, advocated for justice. Civil unrest broke out between Catholics and Protestants in the region and the violence escalated as the pro-Catholic IRA battled British troops. An ongoing series of terrorist bombings and attacks ensued in a drawn-out conflict that came to be known as “The Troubles.” Peace talks eventually took place throughout the mid- to late 1990s, but a permanent end to the violence remained elusive. Finally, in July 2005, the IRA announced its members would give up all their weapons and pursue the group’s objectives solely through peaceful means. By the fall of 2006, the Independent Monitoring Commission reported that the IRA’s military campaign to end British rule was over.