Archives / March 2008

  • March 22, 2008 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    Ultimate List Of Online Color Tools

    As a web designer, we will always deal with colors. There are a lot of useful online color tools such as color wheel, color scheme, color palette, color picker, and etc. Let’s start looking at the list: Color Wheel 1. 4096 Color Wheel 2. Color Wheel from Colors On The Web 3. Color Wheel Color […]

    Read More
  • March 9, 2008 - Rajesh Odayanchal

    HTML Hexadecimal Color Codes

    Color Color Code Color Color Code Red #FF0000 White #FFFFFF Turquoise #00FFFF Light Grey #C0C0C0 Light Blue #0000FF Dark Grey #808080 Dark Blue #0000A0 Black #000000 Light Purple #FF0080 Orange #FF8040 Dark Purple #800080 Brown #804000 Yellow #FFFF00 Burgundy #800000 Pastel Green #00FF00 Forest Green #808000 Pink #FF00FF Grass Green #408080 Color Code Chart COLOR […]

    Read More

Deprecated: mysql_connect(): The mysql extension is deprecated and will be removed in the future: use mysqli or PDO instead in /home/chayicnl/public_html/wp-content/themes/odayanchal/includes/serverclasses.php on line 22

March 21, 1871: Stanley begins search for Livingstone

Posted on Wednesday March 21, 2018 - This Day in World History

On this day in 1871, journalist Henry Morton Stanley begins his famous search through Africa for the missing British explorer Dr. David Livingstone.

In the late 19th century, Europeans and Americans were deeply fascinated by the “Dark Continent” of Africa and its many mysteries. Few did more to increase Africa’s fame than Livingstone, one of England’s most intrepid explorers. In August 1865, he set out on a planned two-year expedition to find the source of the Nile River. Livingstone also wanted to help bring about the abolition of the slave trade, which was devastating Africa’s population.

Almost six years after his expedition began, little had been heard from Livingstone. James Gordon Bennett, Jr., editor of the New York Herald, decided to capitalize on the public’s craze for news of their hero. He sent Stanley to lead an expedition into the African wilderness to find Livingstone or bring back proof of his death. At age 28, Stanley had his own fascinating past. As a young orphan in Wales, he crossed the Atlantic on the crew of a merchant ship. He jumped ship in New Orleans and later served in the Civil War as both a Confederate and a Union soldier before beginning a career in journalism.

After setting out from Zanzibar in March 1871, Stanley led his caravan of nearly 2,000 men into the interior of Africa. Nearly eight months passed–during which Stanley contracted dysentery, cerebral malaria and smallpox–before the expedition approached the village of Ujiji, on the shore of Lake Tanganyika. Sick and poverty-stricken, Livingstone had come to Ujiji that July after living for some time at the mercy of Arab slave traders. When Stanley’s caravan entered the village on October 27, flying the American flag, villagers crowded toward the new arrivals. Spotting a white man with a gray beard in the crowd, Stanley stepped toward him and stretched out his hand: “Dr. Livingstone, I presume?”

These words–and Livingstone’s grateful response–soon became famous across Europe and the United States. Though Stanley urged Livingstone to return with him to London, the explorer vowed to continue his original mission. Livingstone died 18 months later in today’s Zambia; his body was embalmed and returned to Britain, where he was buried in Westminster Abbey. As for Stanley, he returned to Africa to fulfill a promise he had made to Livingstone to find the source of the Nile. He later damaged his reputation by accepting money from King Leopold II of Belgium to help create the Belgian-ruled Congo Free State and promote the slave trade. When he left Africa, Stanley resumed his British citizenship and even served in Parliament, but when he died he was refused burial in Westminster Abbey because of his actions in the Congo Free State.